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NCC News Bite | December 2020

 

This edition contains the following articles:

 

 


News from the 41st National Nutrient Databank Conference (NNDC)

 

NCC was pleased to be a part of the 41st NNDC held virtually on November 16-18.  We learned a lot about the food and nutrient database work being done nationally and internationally and the needs of the attendees. Our future database work will be strengthened by the insights we gained from this important conference.

 

We were pleased to share some of our work through oral presentations. Most notably, we shared the methodology we developed to add lignans to NDSR and we reported on the extent to which nonnutritive sweeteners are found in brand name food products in NDSR. Click on the links below to view the abstracts for each of these topics.

 

Distribution of Lignans in Different Food Categories

Nonnutritive Sweeteners in Brand Name Food Products in the U.S. Marketplace

 

Mark your calendars for the 42nd National Nutrient Databank Conference to be held in Ottawa, the capital city of Canada, from May 16 to 18, 2022.

 

 


How does NDSR compare to the ASA24?

 

A number of you have asked how NDSR compares to NIH’s Automated Self-administered 24-hour Dietary Recall System (ASA24). In brief, NDSR is a PC-based dietary analysis program for 24-hour dietary recall collection and analysis of food records, menus, and recipes. Collection of dietary recalls is carried out by an interviewer who is trained in the use of NDSR. The dietary recalls may be collected over the telephone or in-person.

 

The ASA24 is a web-based dietary analysis program for 24-hour dietary recall and food record collection. It is designed for self-administration, and thus requires the study participant have internet access and some level of literacy and familiarity with computers or mobile devices.

 

The NDSR and ASA24 differ in a variety of important ways beyond platform and mode of use. To summarize, NDSR has more foods, nutrients, and quality assurance capabilities than ASA24.  In addition, NDSR includes features that allow for analyzing the nutrient content of recipes and planning menus that meet study-specified nutrient targets.

 

More details regarding the differences and similarities of the NDSR and ASA24 are provided at the following links:

 

Comparison of NDSR vs ASA24 for 24-hour Dietary Recall Collection

Comparison of Nutrients, Nutrient Ratios and Other Food Components in NDSR and ASA24

Comparison of Food Patterns/Group Data Available in NDSR and ASA24 Output Files

 


Historical Record of Nutrient Data Sources for Foods in NDSR

 

NCC is committed to providing you with verified and updated nutrient values in each version of our database and NDSR. In fact, did you know that NCC maintains a Reference Food Table containing a permanent historical record of every nutrient and other data element (e.g. retention factors, yield factors) used for foods into the NCC Food and Nutrient Database?  Detailed records of all data sources and imputation procedures are maintained for each nutrient value.  If you have a question about a specific nutrient value for a food entered into NDSR, you can contact us at ndsrhelp@umn.edu to inquire about the data source.

 


January NDSR Training on Zoom

 

The NDSR Training Workshop scheduled for January 11-12, 2021 will be conducted by Zoom.  Register here by December 30 if you are interested in the January training.  If the limited seats in the training are filled, registration will close early.  We anticipate that NDSR Training Workshops will be virtual trainings through at least June 2021.

 

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New Foods

 

The following new foods are available to you at no additional charge with this edition of the NCC News Bite. A New Foods Backup File is available for download on our website under New Food Backup Files“December 2020”.

  • Orgain Plant Based Protein Powder – Vanilla
  • Lavva Non-Dairy Yogurt – Vanilla
  • Starbucks Egg White & Roasted Red Pepper Sous Vide Egg Bites
  • Lay’s Poppables – White Cheddar
  • Thomas High Fiber English Muffin
  • Zone Perfect Bar – Chocolate Peanut Butter
  • Bamba Peanut Snacks
  • Muscle Milk Chocolate Shake

 

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NCC News Bite | October 2020

This edition contains the following articles:


NDSR 2020 is available!

 

We want to make sure that everyone knows that NDSR 2020 is now available!  If your annual support is current as of July, the primary account holder at your institution should have received an email with a link to download the newest version of NDSR.  If you haven’t already, we highly recommend upgrading to NDSR 2020, as we have made program improvements and added new foods. For tips on upgrading, see our FAQ page and click on ‘Upgrading’.  If you did not receive an email with an upgrade link, contact NDSRhelp@umn.edu.

 


New Tutorials for the Menu Planner Feature

 

We have posted three short online tutorials on our website to help you learn how to use the new Menu Planner feature available in NDSR 2020.

 

Introduction to the Menu Planner Feature (4 minutes)
Setting Up the Planner Tab in a Menu Record (5 minutes)
Using Auto Adjust in a Menu Record (5 minutes)

 

Chapter 6 in the NDSR 2020 User Manual also includes detailed instructions on using the Menu Planner feature.

 


Foods consumed by Black immigrant groups being expanded in NDSR!

 

 NCC is undertaking a new initiative to add foods consumed by the following immigrant groups to NDSR: Nigerian-American, Jamaican-American, Haitian-American, and Somali-American. We anticipate adding foods over a multi-year period, beginning with NDSR 2021. We would love to hear from you about your needs in this area as well as any resources (e.g. recipes, cookbooks, etc.) that might be helpful to us (email NDSRhelp@umn.edu).

 

 


November NDSR Training on Zoom

 

NCC conducted NDSR Training Workshops by Zoom since June with great success.  Feedback received from trainees continues to be positive. Future NDSR Training Workshops by Zoom are scheduled for November 9-10 and January 11-12.  Register here by October 29 if you are interested in the November training.  If the limited seats in the training are filled, registration will close early.

 


Certification After NDSR Training

 

Individuals who attend our two day NDSR Training are eligible to be NDSR Certified (additional fee applies).  The certification process consists of completing ten practice recalls and two certification recalls with NCC trainers.  We recommend that trainees start their certification process within three to four months of when they attend the training workshop, as those who wait longer have a harder time passing their certification.  We now have a policy that individuals must complete their certification within two years of attending training.  After that, the certification fee will be charged again if you want to be certified.  For those who have paid for certification and attended training more than two years ago, we are granting a one year grace period.  If you complete your certification by November 1, 2021, you will not be charged again.  Email Julia Lorenzana Peasley at peas0027@umn.edu to initiate your certification process or ask questions.

 

 

NCC News Bite | August 2020

This edition contains the following articles:


NDSR 2020 is available!

 

We want to make sure that everyone knows that NDSR 2020 is now available!  If your annual support is current as of August the primary account holder at your institution should have received an email with a link to download the newest version of NDSR.  If you haven’t already, we highly recommend upgrading to the NDSR 2020, as we have made program improvements and added new foods. Highlights include a new menu planner feature to streamline planning nutrient controlled menus for feeding studies or planning menus in which there are nutrient targets; the addition of major Omega-6 fatty acids found in food (PUFA 18:2 n-6; PUFA 18:3 n-6; PUFA 20:4 n-6)and total Omega-6; and updates to many food product categories including plant-based meat alternative products.  For tips on upgrading, see our FAQ page and click on ‘Upgrading’.  If you did not receive an email with an upgrade link, contact NDSRHelp@umn.edu.

 

If you are not a currently supported and want access to NDSR 2020, email NDSRHelp@umn.edu for pricing and other details on reinstating support.

 


New Menu Planner Feature in NDSR 2020

 

We have heard positive buzz about the new Menu Planner feature in NDSR 2020, and some questions as well. One question is whether the feature is included in the program or requires separate licensing.  The good news is the menu planner feature is a part of the current NDSR 2020 program (no additional installation or licensing fee required for access).  It can be accessed by simply setting up a new project for menu records, with this feature selected as a preference in the project preference tab. You can learn more about the Menu Planner feature by viewing the short (4 minute) ‘Introduction to the Menu Planner Feature’ tutorial available on the NDSR Training Modules page on our website.

 

We want to thank the NDSR Users who shared their menu planning needs with us. Their insights were useful to us in designing this feature to meet the unique needs of those planning nutrient controlled menus. In the coming years we plan to enhance this feature to maximize its usefulness. Consequently, if you use the Menu Planner feature we encourage you to provide input and share ideas on how it may be improved. Just send us emails (NDSRHelp@umn.edu) and we’ll log all ideas for consideration in future versions of NDSR.

 

 


Dietary Supplement Assessment Module (DSAM) Database Updated in NDSR 2020

 

The Dietary Supplement Assessment Module (DSAM) database in NDSR 2020 has been updated with the NHANES 2015-2016 Dietary Supplement Database and NCC maintained supplements.

 

The following are key changes to the Supplement Facts Panel label and have been implemented in the NDSR 2020 DSAM database and output files 12-21.

 

  • Vitamin A is now reported in Retinol Activity Equivalents (mcg) instead of International Units (IU).
  • Vitamin D is now reported in mcg instead of IU.
  • Vitamin E is now reported in Total Alpha-Tocopherol (mg) instead of International Units (IU).
  • Folate is now reported in Dietary Folate Equivalents (DFE) instead of Total Folate (mcg).
  • Niacin is now reported in Niacin Equivalents (mg) instead of Niacin (mg).
  • Added Sugars is on the label.
  • The Daily Values changed for many nutrients. [FDA daily values]

 

Data from the NHANES 2015-2016 Dietary Supplement Database does not yet reflect the new labeling rules.  This also applies to some of the supplements maintained by NCC because the new label changes were not on some of the manufacturer websites during the time NCC was updating the DSAM database.  

 

For information about combining nutrient intake from food and dietary sources, see the NCC FAQ website.

 

 


September NDSR Training on Zoom

 

NCC conducted the NDSR Training Workshop by Zoom in June due to the pandemic.  Feedback received from trainees was very positive. Future NDSR Training Workshops by Zoom are scheduled for September 21-22 and November 9-10.  Register here by September 10 if you are interested in the September training.

 

 


New Foods

 

The following new foods are available to you at no additional charge with this edition of the NCC News Bite. A New Foods Backup File is available for download on our website under New Food Backup Files“Summer 2020”.

 

  • Trader Joe’s Peanut Butter Protein Granola
  • Birch Benders Keto Pancake & Waffle Mix
  • Skinny Pop Popcorn
  • Boost Very High Calorie Nutritional Drink
  • Oreos – Lemon
  • Garden of Eatin’ Grain Free Tortilla Chips
  • Dave’s Killer Bread – Good Seed
  • Nature Valley XL Protein Chewy Bar – Peanut Butter Dark Chocolate

What’s New in NDSR 2020?

PROGRAM IMPROVEMENTS

 

New – Menu Planner Features

Several new features were added to the Menu record type in NDSR 2020 to streamline use of NDSR for planning nutrient-controlled menus for feeding studies or planning menus in which there are nutrient targets.

 

These new features will allow the user to specify nutrients of interest for a menu, set nutrient targets with tolerance ranges for that menu, and then adjust food items and amounts to meet targets via a new interactive Planner tab window. A brief video providing an overview of the new Menu Planner Feature is available online.

 

More information can be found in Chapter 6 – Managing NDSR Menu Records in the NDSR 2020 User Manual.

 

FOOD AND NUTRIENT DATABASE UPDATES AND ADDITIONS

 

New – Variable ingredients for whole grain bread, pasta, and rice in mixed dishes and sandwiches

The new variable ingredients prompts users to select between white and whole wheat grain options for many common mixed dishes and sandwiches, allowing for more specificity. 

 

New Nutrients – Omega-6 Fatty Acids

To support research on Omega-6 fatty acids we added the major Omega-6 fatty acids found in food (PUFA 18:2 n-6; PUFA 18:3 n-6; PUFA 20:4 n-6) to NDSR 2020. In addition, total Omega-6 (sum of the individual Omega-6 fatty acids) was also added to the database and program.

 

The 6 existing fatty acids were renamed for clarity: 1) added ‘n-3’ to PUFA 20:5 [EPA], PUFA 22:5 [DPA], and PUFA 22:6 [DHA] descriptions, and 2) added ‘undifferentiated’ to PUFA 18:2, PUFA 18:3, and PUFA 20:4.

 

Food Updates

Many food categories were updated to better reflect the products available in the marketplace. Categories updated include:

  • Frozen treats
  • Lunch meats
  • The following commercial entrée brands: Amy’s, Banquet, Healthy Choice, Hormel / Dinty Moore, Marie Callendar’s, Nestle Hot Pockets & Lean Pockets, and veggie burgers
  • The following fast food restaurants: Chick-Fil-A, KFC, Papa John’s, Sonic, Taco Bell, and Wendy’s
  • Ready-to-eat cereals: Kellogg’s, Post, and Quaker
  • The following brands of meat substitutes were added or updated: Amy’s, Beyond Meat, Boca Burger, Gardein, Good Catch, Impossible Burger, Morningstar Farms, Quorn, Tofurky, and Worthington

A number of new foods were added including:

  • Lasagna, from frozen options
  • Veggie tots
  • Bubble tea
  • Southwest chicken salad
  • Macaroni and cheese from microwave cup (e.g. Easy Mac)
  • Spinach dip
  • Hard seltzer (e.g. White Claw)
  • Lentil flour
  • Coke Energy
  • Additional gluten-free pasta options (e.g. brown rice pasta, edamame, lentil) 

 

Changes to FDA Reference Amount Customarily Consumed (RACC) incorporated

Changes were made to some of the RACCs (serving sizes) that appear on Nutrition Facts panels as part of the new Nutrition Facts Panel rules implemented in 2020. Accordingly, these changes were made in NDSR. The FDA Serving Size column in output files 01 and 02 align with current RACCs.

 

DIETARY SUPPLEMENT DATABASE UPDATES

 

The DSAM database was updated with NHANES 2015-2016 Dietary Supplement Database and NCC maintained supplements.

NCC News Bite | June 2020

 

 

This edition contains the following articles:


New Nutrients coming to NDSR 2020

To support research on omega-6 fatty acids, we are adding the major Omega-6 fatty acids found in food (PUFA 18:2 n-6; PUFA 18:3 n-6; PUFA 20:4 n-6) to NDSR 2020. In addition, total Omega-6 (sum of the individual omega-6 fatty acids) is being added to the database and program.

 

REMINDERS:

When new nutrients or food components are added to the database and NDSR program, the new values will appear in new columns at the end of NDSR output files. 

 

Also, you can obtain new nutrients and food components for records entered in olderversions of the program by restoring records and generating outputfiles in the latest version of NDSR.

 


Tips for Using NDSR with Dual Monitors

As using dual or multiple computer monitors is becoming more common in the workplace, we want to let you know that NDSR works best when you use it on your primary monitor.  Some functions in NDSR do not work correctly if used on a secondary monitor.  Also, if you use NDSR on your secondary monitor during one session and then disconnect the secondary monitor for the following work session, you will have problems accessing all NDSR windows on the primary monitor.  To prevent this from happening, move all NDSR windows back to the primary monitor before disconnecting the secondary monitor.

 

 


Caution in Using Individual Nutrients (NTRNs) in NDSR

It has come to our attention recently that some NDSR users are adding or subtracting individual nutrients (NTRNs) to User Recipes in NDSR. This is being done to create User Recipes for commercial products that match the Nutrition Facts panel, and we advise against doing this for the reason described in the paragraph that follows. 

 

The NTRNs in the database were designed primarily for users who wish to create a User Recipe for a food for which nutrient values were determined by chemically analyzing the food in a laboratory setting. Beyond this intended use, the NTRNs have a limitation. The limitation is that NTRNS do not relate to any other nutrients or food components in the database. For example, if you add total protein to a User Recipe using the NTRN for protein, you are adding a specific amount of protein, but not adding calories or any of the individual amino acids associated with that protein.  Another example is the lack of relationship between different forms or units for a nutrient. For example if the NTRN for vitamin A in International Units is used to add vitamin A to a food, the other forms of this nutrient (e.g. vitamin A in Retinol Activity Equivalents and Retinol Equivalents) are not added.

 

Please note that if you are trying to adjust the micronutrients of a food, you may want to use the components for food fortification in NDSR, which we refer to as SFORs.  For example, if you want to make a User Recipe for a food to better match a product label, you could start with an NDSR food that is a close match (e.g. Cheerios).  Then add or subtract one of the components for food fortification, such as calcium or vitamin C.   We also advise using SFORs with caution, especially when subtracting an amount, as the danger is a net negative value for the food.  However, the SFORs will more appropriately maintain their relationships with other nutrients in the database as shown below.

 

 

The next image shows the difference between the SFOR calcium (first search result) and the NTRN calcium (second search result).

 

 

You are welcome to contact us with questions about the difference between using NTRNs and SFORs and what might be best for your work.  Contact us at NDSRHelp@umn.edu.

NCC News Bite | March 2020

Aroma herb and spice on the wooden table

This edition contains the following articles:


NCC is Fully Operational

We know that many of you are experiencing major changes in your workplace due to COVID-19. We also understand that even during these challenging times your work is critically important and needs to continue.  Please be aware that our User Support team is available to assist you with any particular requirements with your NDSR software licensing and technical issues related to COVID-19 remote work. In addition, we will continue to process all new license requests and annual support renewals.

 

Nutrition Coordinating Center (NCC) staff are all currently working remotely, and consequently it may take some extra time for us to respond to your questions. Thank you for your patience. Please continue to email us at ndsrhelp@umn.edu for assistance with your remote access needs and your regular NDSR questions.


Collecting 24 hour Dietary Recalls by Phone

We have heard from many of our NDSR users regarding the significant impact that the public health emergency for COVID-19 has had on their research studies.  Our clients are taking all the steps necessary to ensure the safety of their study participants and research staff.  Some studies have transitioned to dietary data collection by phone instead of during in-person study visits.  A sample procedures manual for the collection of 24-hour dietary recalls by phone using NDSR is available on our website.  Feel free to contact ndsrhelp@umn.edu if you have any questions about the sample protocol.

 

 


Upcoming NDSR Training Workshops

The NDSR Training Workshop scheduled for May 5-6 (rescheduled from April 27-28) will be provided in an online rather than in-person format.  Registration for the training will be available through Friday, April 17 or until spaces are filled.  Note that we will have up to six seats available for this online training.

 

The June 15-16 NDSR Training Workshop may also be transitioned to an online format, pending University and CDC recommendations regarding in-person instruction and travel restrictions.  Please contact Julia Lorenzana Peasley (peas0027@umn.edu) if you have any questions.

 


What’s New in NDSR 2020

Throughout the year, the NCC database staff is diligently working to update the food and nutrient database that supports NDSR. This can be a challenge with the rapidly changing food marketplace. Following are some of the database updates that you can look forward to in NDSR 2020.

 

New – Variable ingredients for whole grain bread, pasta, rice in mixed dishes and sandwiches

 

These new variable ingredients will allow users to select between white and whole wheat grain options for many common mixed dishes and sandwiches, allowing for more specificity.

 

Database Improvements in NDSR 2020

The following brands of meat substitutes will be updated or added: Amy’s, Beyond Meat, Boca Burger, Gardein, Good Catch, Impossible Burger, Morningstar Farms, Quorn, Tofurky, and Worthington.

  • The following commercial entrée brands will be updated: Amy’s, Banquet, Healthy Choice, Hormel / Dinty Moore, Marie Callendar’s, and Nestle Hot Pockets & Lean Pockets.
  • The following fast food restaurants will be updated: Chick-Fil-A, KFC, Papa John’s, Sonic, Taco Bell, and Wendy’s.
  • The following ready-to-eat cereals will be updated: Kellogg’s, Post, and Quaker.
  • New foods added will include:
    • Lasagna, from frozen options
    • Veggie tots
    • Additional gluten-free pasta options (e.g. brown rice pasta, edamame, lentil)
  • In addition, the frozen treats and lunchmeat food categories will be updated.


No Price Increase for July 2020 – June 2021

Current prices for NDSR licensing and annual support will remain the same through June 2021. The NCC price list is available here.

 

NCC News Bite | January 2020

This edition contains the following articles:


What to Look Forward to in NDSR 2020?

NCC staff is working hard every day to update the NDSR program and the food and nutrient database that supports it. Here are some of the major updates you can look forward to in NDSR 2020:

 

Menu Planner Features

Several new features are being added to the Menu record type in NDSR 2020 to streamline use of NDSR for planning nutrient-controlled menus for feeding studies or planning menus in which there are nutrient targets.

 

These new features will allow the user to set nutrient targets with tolerance ranges for a menu, and then adjust food items and amounts to meet targets within upper and lower limits via a new interactive Planner tab window.

 

These new features were developed based on guidance provided by some of you who currently use NDSR to plan feeding study menus. We thank you for your input, and we are confident the new features will be enormously helpful to you and others using NDSR for planning menus.

 

 

New Nutrients – Omega-6 Fatty Acids
Numerous studies have examined the role of omega-3 fatty acids in health. However, newer research has examined the effects of their lesser-known cousin, the omega-6 fatty acids, on risk for some diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. To support research on omega-6 fatty acids we are adding the major Omega-6 fatty acids found in food (PUFA 18:2 n-6; PUFA 18:3 n-6; PUFA 20:4 n-6) to NDSR 2020. In addition, total Omega-6 (sum of the individual omega-6 fatty acids) is being added to the database and program.

 

 


41st Annual National Nutrient Databank Conference

The 41st Annual National Nutrient Databank Conference, 20-20 Vision for Food
Composition Data: Promoting Public Health Worldwide, will be held at The Hotel
at the University of Maryland in College Park, Maryland, April 19 to 22, 2020.
Registration is available online.

 

NCC will have a strong presence at the conference. You may find the following NCC presentations very helpful and informative.

 

Title:                Nonnutritive sweeteners in brand name food products in the U.S. marketplace

Presenter:       Lisa Harnack, DrPH, RD, MPH, Director of the Nutrition Coordinating center

Session:            Use of Product Label Data to Promote Public Health

Date:                 Tuesday, April 21

 

Title:                  Distribution of Lignans in Different Food Categories

Presenter:      Bhaskarani Jasthi, PhD, RD, LD, NCC Food and Nutrient Database Scientist

Session:            Focus on Food Constituents

Date:                 Tuesday, April 21

 

Drs. Harnack and Jasthi would welcome the opportunity to talk with
you to discuss your NDSR needs and answer questions you may have about the
program.  Feel free to stop by their presentations or send an email to harna001@umn.edu if you would like to arrange a time to meet during the conference.

 


New Foods

The following foods are included with the NCC News Bite for January 2020. A New
Foods Backup File is available for download on
our website under New Food Backup Files“January 2020”.

  • Arbonne Essentials Protein Shake Mix – Vanilla
  • Freschetta Gluten Free Pizza – Pepperoni
  • Jonny Pops Frozen Fruit Bar – Raspberry Blueberry and Cream
  • Whole Foods 365 Cauliflower Pizza Crust
  • Protein One Bar – Strawberries & Cream
  • Ideal Protein Chocolate Drink
  • Built Bar – Salted Caramel
  • Dole Chopped Salad Kit – Chipotle & Cheddar

NCC News Bite | September 2019

 

 

This edition contains the following articles:

Looking for something on our website?
NDSR 2019 is here!
Updated SAS code available for calculating HEI-2015 Scores
Is there someone you want added to the NCC News Bite listserv?

 


Looking for something on our website?

We have many resources and tools available on our website, but we have heard from some of you that it can be hard to find the information that you are looking for.  Next time you are searching for something, try using our search bar by clicking on the magnifying glass (circled on the image below) on the right side of the menu bar on our home page.  Type in what you are looking for, and ‘Enter’.  You can search on terms such as ‘HEI’, ‘output’, or ‘sample recall procedures’.

 

 


NDSR 2019 is here!

We want to make sure that everyone knows that NDSR 2019 is now available!  If your annual support is current as of July, the primary account holder at your institution should have received an email with a link to download the newest version of NDSR.  If you haven’t already, we highly recommend upgrading to the NDSR 2019, as we have made program improvements and added new foods.  For tips on upgrading, see our FAQ page and click on ‘Upgrading’.  If you did not receive an email with an upgrade link, contact NDSRHelp@umn.edu.

 

 


Updated SAS code available for calculating HEI-2015 Scores

One of the program changes we made in NDSR 2019 affects the NCC Food Group Serving Count System.  If you are calculating  HEI-2015 Scores using data collected in or restored in NDSR 2019 or a subsequent version of the program, we recommend that you use the new SAS Code available on our website.

 

 


Is there someone you want added to the NCC News Bite listserv?

Please email ndsrhelp@umn.edu with the name and email address for anyone you’d like added to our email list.  We send out six to eight emails per year, and we never share or sell email addresses to external parties.

 

What’s New in NDSR 2019?

PROGRAM IMPROVEMENTS

 
NewFood Serving Count System and Resulting HEI SAS Code Changes for NDSR 2019
 The NCC Food Group Serving Count System has been expanded to include six new food groups:

  • Unsweetened Flavored Milk Beverage Powder with Non-fat Dry Milk
  • Unsweetened Flavored Milk Beverage Powder without Non-fat Dry Milk
  • Yogurt – Unsweetened Whole Milk
  • Yogurt – Unsweetened Low Fat
  • Yogurt – Unsweetened Fat Free
  • Dairy-based Unsweetened Meal Replacement/Supplement

These new food groups will help clients who are interested in differentiating between flavored milk beverage powders, yogurts, and dairy-based meal replacements/supplements that are unsweetened vs artificially sweetened (previously unsweetened products were classified in the ‘artificially sweetened’ categories for these foods).
 
The addition of these food groups has implications for calculating Healthy Eating Index (HEI) 2015 scores, and thus NCC has made new SAS code available on the NCC website for calculating the HEI 2015. It is recommended that you use the new SAS code instead of the previous code if you are using data collected in or restored in NDSR 2019 or a subsequent version of the program.
 
New – Updated Daily Values (DV) Report

A new Nutrition Fact label is coming to the marketplace, with the new label already appearing on some food products in anticipation of the mandatory implementation date of January 1, 2020 (smaller manufacturers have until January 1, 2021 to comply).
 
The new label has a myriad of changes. To summarize, added sugars and vitamin D are required on the new label, and the Daily Value (DV) levels for many of the label nutrients have changed to reflect current recommended intake levels. For some nutrients the unit has changed. Most notably, vitamin D is in mcg on the new label instead of IU. Also, folic acid is in the unit of mcg Dietary Folate Equivalents (DFE) instead of mcg. To keep pace with this change, the Daily Values (DV) Report in NDSR 2019 aligns with the new label.

 

FOOD AND NUTRIENT DATABASE UPDATES AND ADDITIONS

 
New Nutrients – Lignans

NDSR now includes Total Lignans and four of its subtypes: Secoisolariciresinol, Matairesinol, Lariciresinol, and Pinoresinol. Lignans are a large group of polyphenols present in a wide variety of plant foods, including seeds (flax, pumpkin, sunflower, poppy, sesame), whole grains (rye, oats, barley), bran (wheat, oat, rye), beans, fruit (particularly berries), and vegetables.
 
Database Improvements in NDSR 2019

  • The FNDDS 2015-2016 Database was used to update foods with nutrient and non-nutrient data.
  •  

  • The Legacy Release of the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference was used to update foods with nutrient and non-nutrient (e.g. density, food specific units, etc.) data.
  •  

  • The yogurt category has been updated. This process included updating existing brands and adding several new brands that have emerged in the marketplace. Over 250 brand name yogurts are in NDSR 2019. While updating, we noticed a number of marketplace trends that make yogurts today different than those available the last time we updated this category. Most notably, the types of sweeteners used in yogurt have shifted. To summarize, acesulfame potassium/sucralose and Stevia/sugar blends appear to be more common, while aspartame is no longer used.
  •  

  • Juice and juice drinks have been updated. This process included updating existing brands and adding several new brands that have emerged in the marketplace, with over 100 brand name juice and juice drinks included in NDSR 2019. While updating, we noticed that some manufacturers are reducing the sugar content of their juice drinks by using a combination of sugar and an artificial sweetener (e.g. Stevia or sucralose).
  •  

  • New options for entering watermelon were added. The standard slice that has been in NDSR is a very large slice–a cylinder that is a full cross-section of a 7 1/2″ diameter watermelon which is equivalent to about 1.88 cups of watermelon. In NDSR 2019, this is now called the extra large slice. In addition to this pre-existing slice, there are now options for 1/8 of that cylinder as a small slice, 1/4 of that cylinder as a medium slice, and 1/2 of that cylinder as a large slice. Another new unit that is available is fruit only:  chunk, 2″ x 1″ x 1″ (without rind).  This can be used if a chunk of watermelon is reported without specified dimensions. For more information see the June 2019 News Bite.
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  • Many additional food categories were updated to better reflect the products available in the marketplace. These updates include:
    • The following commercial entrée brands: Chef Boyardee, Jenny Craig, Kashi, Michelina’s, and Smucker’s Uncrustables.
    • The following fast food restaurants: Arby’s, Boston Market, Burger King, Chipotle, Church’s Chicken, Jack In The Box, McDonald’s, and Subway.
    • Ready-to-eat cereals: Attune Foods, Barbara’s, Familia Swiss Muesli, Kashi, and Kretschmer.
    • Pancake and waffle mixes.
     

  • New foods that have been added to this version of NDSR include:
    • Bone broth
    • Chili con queso with meat
    • Clarified butter (ghee)
    • Gluten free Bisquick
    • Gluten free pancake mix
    • Jelly sandwich
    • Sweet potato puffs
    • Taco Bell breakfast items

 

NCC News Bite | June 2019

 

This edition contains the following articles:

 

Food Serving Count System and Resulting HEI SAS Code Changes for NDSR 2019
Creating Multiple NDSR Reports at Once (Batch Printing)
New Options for Entering Watermelon Coming in NDSR 2019
Do you know about the “Additional Files” folder available to support analysis of NDSR output file data?


 

Food Serving Count System and Resulting HEI SAS Code Changes for NDSR 2019

 

NCC will expand the NCC Food Group Serving Count System with the release of NDSR 2019 to include six new food groups:

• Unsweetened Flavored Milk Beverage Powder with Non-fat Dry Milk
• Unsweetened Flavored Milk Beverage Powder without Non-fat Dry Milk
• Yogurt – Unsweetened Whole Milk
• Yogurt – Unsweetened Low Fat
• Yogurt – Unsweetened Fat Free
• Dairy-based Unsweetened Meal Replacement/Supplement

These new food groups will help clients who are interested in differentiating between flavored milk beverage powders, yogurts, and dairy-based meal replacements/supplements that are unsweetened vs artificially sweetened (previously unsweetened products were classified in the ‘artificially sweetened’ categories for these foods).

The addition of these food groups has implications for calculating Healthy Eating Index (HEI) 2015 scores, and thus NCC will be providing new SAS code on the NCC website for calculating the HEI 2015. It is recommended that you use the new SAS code instead of the previous code if you are using data collected in or restored in NDSR 2019 or a subsequent version of the program.
 
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Creating Multiple NDSR Reports at Once (Batch Printing)

At times it may be useful to save or print NDSR reports for multiple records at a time. For example, you may want to save Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load Reports for several records to email to a colleague, or you may want to print Foods Reports for multiple recalls collected by a dietary interviewer to provide some written notes or feedback from your quality assurance process. To create reports on multiple records within the same project, open one record in the project. Then highlight the records on the left pane for which you want to generate the reports. Next, select the report you want to create from the ‘Reports’ menu. You will then be prompted to select if you want to print or to save the selected reports. If you choose to save, you will then need to browse to the folder where you want the reports to be saved.

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New Options for Entering Watermelon Coming in NDSR 2019

When watermelon is reported in a dietary recall or food record, it can be described as a slice or as cut up in many different ways for eating. To help with more accurate data collection and entry, we have added some additional food specific units for this food.

The standard slice that has been in NDSR is a very large slice–a cylinder that is a full
cross-section of a 7 1/2″ diameter watermelon which is equivalent to about 1.88 cups of
watermelon.

 

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In NDSR 2019, this is now called the extra large slice. In addition to this
pre-existing slice, there is now an 1/8 of that cylinder as a small slice, 1/4 of that cylinder as a medium slice, and 1/2 of that cylinder as a large slice.

Pic5 Pic4 Pic6

Previous versions of NDSR also provided the ability to enter watermelon in cubic inches or using the food shapes of cylinder and 3D wedge, and it should be noted that these amounts include the rind. In NDSR 2019, there is a new unit available that is fruit only: ‘chunk, 2″ x 1″ x 1″ (without rind). This can be used if a chunk of watermelon is reported without specified dimensions. It can also be used to enter a different size piece of watermelon that is only fruit. One ‘chunk’ has a volume of two cubic inches. If a participant reports a larger chunk without rind, such as 3” x 3” x 2”, this would equal 18 cubic inches of fruit. To enter the amount of that piece, you could select the ‘chunk’ and enter ‘18/2’, or ‘9’ as the quantity, as that larger chunk is equal to 9 NDSR ‘chunks.’
 
Food Specific Unit (FSU) Options Available for Watermelon in NDSR 2019:
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Do you know about the “Additional Files” folder available to support analysis of NDSR output file data?

We provide a number of additional files with the NDSR program that facilitate creating data files for analysis using SAS or Excel. The Additional Files folder is located in C:\Users\Public\Public Documents\NCC\NDSR 2019\Additional Files. These files include:
 
SAS Program Files: In the ‘SAS Programs’ folder you will find files that help you create SAS data sets for all output files and for all record types. These files include code for assigning formats and labels to the SAS variables, and defining the relationships within a set of Output Files. They can be used as templates and modified according to your specific needs.
 
Spreadsheet Column Headers: In the ‘Spreadsheet Column Headers’ folder you will find tab-delimited text files that identify the columns of a specific output file. A common use of these column headers is to paste them into the first row of a spreadsheet, such as Excel, in which you want to view NDSR Output File data. As a reminder, you can also set your Preferences in NDSR so that the column headers are included in the output files (Important Note: Select this option only if intend to view/analyze the output file data in Excel. Creation of a data sets for analysis in statistical programs such as SAS and SPSS will be more complicated if this output file option is selected). Open the Project Preferences, navigate to the User Preferences tab, and check the box for “Include column headers in output files.”

 

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For instructions on how to create and view output files, see the section titled “Creating an Output File” in Chapter 8 of the NDSR User Manual.
 
For more details about the SAS program files, spreadsheet column header files and other “NDSR Additional Files” see Appendix 18 of the NDSR User Manual.