NCC News Bite | June 2018

This edition contains the following articles:

NDSR May Be Used for Nutrient Analysis of Recipes for Cookbooks, Patient Education Materials, and More
40th National Nutrient Databank Conference (NNDC) Update
Happy 30th Anniversary NDSR!
Food Portion Visual Feedback

 


NDSR May Be Used for Nutrient Analysis of Recipes for Cookbooks, Patient Education Materials, and More

With the NDSR User Recipe record type you can quickly determine the nutrient content of recipes for use in patient education materials, cookbooks, and more. The ‘Daily Values’ and ‘Nutrient Totals’ reports in NDSR allow you to quickly access the nutrient content per serving information for recipes. Nutrient per serving information is also available in NDSR output files.

 

If nutrient values for recipes are published online or in a book or pamphlet, we ask that you acknowledge NDSR as the source of the nutrient values by including the following statement ‘Created with Nutrition Data System for Research (NDSR) [INSERT YEAR] © Regents of the University of Minnesota’.

 

To see an example of what is possible using nutrient analysis results for a recipe analyzed using NDSR; check out this recipe for chia pudding here.

 

Please contact ndsrhelp@umn.edu if you have any questions or need assistance in learning how to analyze recipes in NDSR.

 


40th National Nutrient Databank Conference (NNDC) Update

As the 40th NNDC is approaching closer, we are excited to share that NCC will be presenting one poster and three oral presentations at the conference. Regular registration for the conference is still open. For information on registering and about the conference, visit the NNDC website. NCC staff would love to connect with you at this year’s conference!

 


Happy 30th Anniversary NDSR!

In 1988, NCC released Nutrition Data System for Research, a DOS-based program designed to standardize and increase the efficiency of dietary recall collection and coding. For the first time, coding of foods and amounts was computerized providing immediate calculation of nutrient data. The software was developed for distribution to researchers for use on their computers. A user manual, technical support and training were among the services developed by NCC to support those use of the program, and as you know the program and these services continue today.

 

A few fun facts about the earliest versions of the program:

  • The program was installed via numerous floppy disks inserted into a computer’s disk drive one at a time. Keeping pace with changes in technology, over time NDSR installation moved from large floppy disk, to small floppy disk, to CD-ROM, and then online installation.
  • NDSR training in the early days included teaching basic computer skills such as how to turn a computer on and off. This was needed because some trainees had no prior computer experience.
  • Moving from a DOS to Windows operating system was a big deal. Entirely new program code had to be written, and extensive testing was carried out to get it right. But, all the work was worth it because the program’s user interface improved dramatically thanks to features that became possible with Windows operating system.

 


Food Portion Visual Feedback

In our last News Bite, we asked you to let us know if you are still using the Morgan/Posner Food Portion Visual (FPV). Thank you to those who contacted the NCC User Support team with feedback. Based on the responses we received, we plan to keep FPV as an amount reporting option in NDSR.